June 2014 Statewide Summary

Alaska Statewide Climate Summary

June 2014

 

Temperature

 

June 2014 temperatures were generally colder than normal across the state, with only four of the 19 First Order Stations reporting positive deviations. Calculating the mean daily temperatures of the 19 stations (see Figure), 25 days of the month were below the 30-year normal. The month started out with three colder than normal days, followed by four warm ones. After the 7th temperatures remained mostly below normal for the remainder of the month. The peak deviation (-3.9°F) occurred on the 1st. The monthly mean temperature of all First Order Stations was 50.5°F, 1.2°F below the normal of 51.7°F. This is 4.7°F below the June of 2013 mean of 55.2°F. Bettles held the greatest negative deviation from normal for June at a significant 4.6°F below its long-term mean of 58.5°F. Stations following Bettles with negative deviations equal to or exceeding 3°F: Delta Junction (-3.4°F), and Gulkana (-3.1°F). The only station with a positive deviation exceeding 3°F from normal was Cold Bay at 3.7°F. All four stations with positive deviations were southern coastal stations.

 

The warmest temperature reported for the First Order Stations was 81°F at Fairbanks on the 29th. The coldest temperature was 22°F at Barrow on the 1st. Barrow also reported the lowest June mean temperature at 33.7°F, while Fairbanks reported the highest mean temperature for the month at 58.4°F.

 

Station

Temperature

Observed
(°F)

Normal
(°F)

Delta
(°F)

Anchorage

53.8

55.2

-1.4

Annette

53.8

55.1

-1.3

Barrow

33.7

35.6

-1.9

Bethel

50.9

52.5

-1.6

Bettles

53.9

58.5

-4.6

Cold Bay

50.0

46.3

3.7

Delta Junction

54.2

57.6

-3.4

Fairbanks

58.4

60.4

-2.0

Gulkana

51.3

54.4

-3.1

Homer

52.1

50.6

1.5

Juneau

53.2

54.6

-1.4

King Salmon

50.4

51.5

-1.1

Kodiak

50.7

49.7

1.0

Kotzebue

44.2

45.7

-1.5

McGrath

54.6

57.4

-2.8

Nome

45.8

47.8

-2.0

St. Paul Island

43.9

42.4

1.5

Talkeetna

54.1

57.0

-2.9

Yakutat

49.9

50.8

-0.9

 

 

 

Description: First Order Temperature

Daily mean temperature deviation from the normal temperature for the mean of the first order stations for June 2014.

 

A very limited number of record temperature events were reported for June, and all but one were coastal stations. Bettles was the only interior stations with a record event. Cold Bay has two high events, King Salmon two low events. St Paul had two new high records, and a tied low event.

 

 

Temperature Records

Date

Station

Element

New
Record

Old
Record

Year of
old Record

06/02/14

Bettles

Low Temperature

30

30

1960

06/02/14

Cold Bay

High Temperature

60

60

1990

06/03/14

Cold Bay

High Temperature

61

59

1996

06/03/14

King Salmon

Low Temperature

28

32

1982

06/05/14

St. Paul

High Temperature

56

54

2003

06/16/14

King Salmon

Low Temperature

32

32

1970

06/19/14

St. Paul

High Temperature

54

53

1993

06/22/14

St. Paul

Low Temperature

33

33

1959

 

 

Precipitation

 

The overall precipitation calculated as the mean of the percentage deviations of the 19 stations, was 74% above normal. Only five of the First Order Stations and seven days of the month reported below normal values. The greatest daily deviation of 337% occurred on the 25th, during a storm that brought heavy rain across much of the state. Barrow's extreme deviation of 359% above normal topped the stations for June. On a monthly basis, Barrow had the greatest positive deviation from normal, with a total of 1.47", or 459% of the expected amount of 0.32", which represents the highest June total on record. This far above normal precipitation amount continues the above normal trend of May, at which Barrow had a deviation of 500% of normal, again an absolute maximum for May. Following Barrow, with values at or above 200% of normal, were Anchorage (343%), Fairbanks (260%), Bettles (253%), Juneau (228%), Delta Junction (216%), and Talkeetna (206%). Leading the stations with lower than normal precipitation totals were Nome with just 22%, and Cold Bay with 39% of normal. The dryer than normal conditions felt at the Western and Bering Sea stations were a result of the storms tracking to the south and impacting the Southcentral, Southeastern and Interior areas of the state.

 

Station

Precipitation

Observed
(in)

Normal
(in)

Delta
(in)

Delta
(%)

(%)

Anchorage

3.33

0.97

2.36

243%

343%

Annette

7.75

4.88

2.87

59%

159%

Barrow

1.47

0.32

1.15

359%

459%

Bethel

1.52

1.72

-0.20

-12%

88%

Bettles

3.54

1.40

2.14

153%

253%

Cold Bay

1.05

2.72

-1.67

-61%

39%

Delta Junction

5.00

2.31

2.69

116%

216%

Fairbanks

3.56

1.37

2.19

160%

260%

Gulkana

2.02

1.40

0.62

44%

144%

Homer

1.49

0.82

0.67

82%

182%

Juneau

7.39

3.24

4.15

128%

228%

King Salmon

3.25

1.65

1.60

97%

197%

Kodiak

6.22

5.91

0.31

5%

105%

Kotzebue

0.38

0.58

-0.20

-34%

66%

McGrath

1.52

1.52

0.00

0%

100%

Nome

0.22

0.98

-0.76

-78%

22%

St. Paul Island

1.02

1.35

-0.33

-24%

76%

Talkeetna

3.95

1.92

2.03

106%

206%

Yakutat

10.10

6.39

3.71

58%

158%

 

 

Description: First Order Precipitation

Daily mean precipitation deviation from the normal for the first order stations for June 2014.

 

 

The maximum monthly precipitation total reported for the First Order Stations was 10.10" at Yakutat, while Kodiak reported the highest daily total of 2.98" on the 6th, a new daily record. The highest one-day snowfall occurred at Barrow on the 1st with 0.4Ó, and Barrow also reported the highest monthly snowfall of 0.9".

 

Due to the high precipitation reported for June for most stations, there were quite a number of daily precipitation records, and most were set towards the end of the month during the repeated storms. Ketchikan's new daily record of 5.45" on the 22nd was also the highest one-day total for any June day in Ketchikan. Topping the stations in deviation was Barrow, and with a monthly total of 1.47", a new June record was set, breaking the 1955 record total precipitation of 1.15". Barrow had trace or more precipitation on 25 days of the month. Juneau had the wettest June on record with 7.48", breaking the 2012 record of 6.69". Fairbanks also had a record wet June with 3.56", just topping the 3.55" record from 1949. Further, it was the second wettest June on record for Anchorage, Delta Junction and Bettles.

 

 

Precipitation Records

Date

Station

Element

New
Record

Old
Record

Year of
old Record

06/06/14

Kodiak

Precipitation

2.98

1.48

1938

06/08/14

Juneau

Precipitation

1.54

0.90

1987

06/09/14

Auke Bay

Precipitation

1.57

0.54

1991

06/09/14

Juneau

Precipitation

0.50

0.46

2002

06/10/14

Anchorage

Precipitation

0.50

0.16

1996

06/11/14

St. Paul

Precipitation

0.33

0.30

2003

06/18/14

Delta Junction

Precipitation

1.61

0.94

1966

06/19/14

Delta Junction

Precipitation

0.81

0.59

2005

06/20/14

Auke Bay

Precipitation

0.47

0.37

2003

06/20/14

Juneau

Precipitation

1.13

1.03

1956

06/21/14

Anchorage

Precipitation

0.73

0.25

1961

06/22/14

Annette

Precipitation

2.96

1.85

1957

06/22/14

Craig

Precipitation

0.53

0.33

2007

06/22/14

Haines Airport

Precipitation

0.73

0.73

2010

06/22/14

Ketchikan

Precipitation

5.45

1.74

1956

06/22/14

Skagway Power

Precipitation

0.27

0.16

2008

06/23/14

Barrow

Precipitation

0.49

0.21

1954

06/25/14

Anchorage

Precipitation

0.78

0.56

1979

06/25/14

Fairbanks

Precipitation

0.87

0.81

1989

06/27/14

Barrow

Precipitation

0.31

0.21

1957

 

 

Description: 4gvf-1

This infrared satellite image from the National Weather Service shows weather pattern affecting the Interior Southcentral portions of Alaska on June 25th, 2014. The storm resulted in heavy rainfall across the region.

 

 

Newsworthy Events

 

By the 3rd, Juneau's wet weather had refilled the Salmon Creek Reservoir. The 8th saw the 100 Mile Creek fire flair up near Delta Junction, brining its size to 9,400 acres. More crews were dispatched, and the fire was reported 50% contained on the 12th. A red flag warning was issued on the 16th for the area around the fire due to warm temperatures and high winds while its size had grown to 23,000 acres and was reported to be 70% contained. A late-season frost hit part of the low-lying areas of Fairbanks on the 12th. Temperatures as low as 26°F were measured in Goldstream Valley, while the Fairbanks Airport stayed above freezing at 38°F. Two small wildfires were contained north of Fairbanks on the 14th. High water caused a washout of an 80-foot section of the Alaska Railroad tracks near Portage on the 18th.

 

The first of two heavy rainfall events to hit the Interior and Southcentral arrived on the 18th, bringing flood watches and warnings across the region. Fairbanks received a total of 1.61" at the Airport, 1.94" at the University, 2.95" at Two Rivers, while the Chatanika received 3.61" and Goodpaster River had 4.61". The Moose Creek Dam floodgates were lowered at 5 am on the 21st to restrict the flow of the Chena River through Fairbanks. This is the 20th time they have been used since 1981. They were left partiality closed until 2 am on the 23rd after which they were raised. Flooding was reported on the Chena, Chatanika, Goodpaster and Salcha Rivers. Crews had completed repairs on the Clear Creek Bridge on the 23rd at mile 324 of the Richardson Highway, which was damaged by high waters. Flood watches and warnings were again issued on the 25th in anticipation of the second rainstorm in a week headed for the Interior and Southcentral. Flood control measures were not needed at the Moose Creek Dam for this second round of rain. Flood watches were also in effect for Susitna Valley and Talkeetna Mountains. The heavy rainfall in the Denali National Park and Preserve flooded the Denali Backcountry Lodge resulting in the evacuation over 100 guests and staff from the lodge, but they were stranded deep in the park as the road was closed to flooding and rock falls, and had in part to be flown out by helicopter.

 

Description: chena discharge.png

Discharge rates for the Chena River at three locations for the last thirteen days of June. The effect of closing the Moose Creek Dam on the 21st can be seen. Data courtesy of the USGS (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ak/nwis/rt).

 

This information consists of preliminary climatological data compiled by the Alaska Climate Research Center, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks. This summary is based on the 19 first order stations in Alaska operated by the National Weather Service. Extreme events of other stations are also mentioned. It should be noted that the new climate normals for the time period of 1981-2010 are applied for the calculations of the deviations, and they can be slightly different from the old normals (1971-2000), which were in use up until end of August 2011.